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Extreme weather here to stay: The future is now (with video) Comment on this post ↓
July 2nd, 2013 by Warren Swil

Arizona fires raise

climate change issue

The home screen of the Weather Underground site. Click image to enlarge.

The fires is raging Arizona and the tragic deaths of 19 heroic firefighters have dominated the news the last few days.
They are but the latest reminder that extreme weather events are becoming both more common and more severe.
“Firefighters battling the Arizona blaze that killed 19 elite colleagues faced a tough task on Tuesday amid an excessive heat warning issued by the National Weather Service,” NBC reported this morning.
“Gusting winds of up to 20 mph threatened to fan the flames near Yarnell, Arizona, and officials were wary about propane tanks known to be in the town of 700 people.”
But this one event should not be viewed in isolation.
It is a pattern, one more aptly described as climate change – despite those skeptics who think it is all a hoax.
 WATCH VIDEO BELOW THE FOLD

The interactive global temperature map from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. government weather watcher.

The interactive global temperature map from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. government weather watcher.

The best evidence I have found is at the Wunderblog site of Dr. Jeff Masters.
According to his bio, “Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.”
A little deeper into the site one finds the real story of recent extreme weather events in an entry dated Dec. 21, 2012.
Top Ten U.S. Weather Events of 2012 should raise alarm bells around the globe (even though it covers only the United States.
The year 2012was another year of incredible weather extremes unparalleled in American history …,” Masters notes.
“ Eleven $1-billion weather disasters hit the U.S., a figure exceeded only by the fourteen such disasters during the equally insane weather year of 2011.”
Not worried yet?
Read on.
Masters then details the “top ten weather stories of 2012, chosen for their meteorological significance and human and economic impact.”
The list (in part):

A list of major weather events in 2012 from Weather Underground.

A list of major weather events in 2012 from Weather Underground.

Huuricane Sandy (October): “[It] was truly astounding in its size and power. At its peak size, 20 hours before landfall, Sandy had tropical storm-force winds that covered an area nearly one-fifth the area of the contiguous United States.”
Warmest year on record:Spring, March, July, and the annual temperature were all [the] warmest on record in the contiguous U.S. “July was the warmest month of any month in the 1,400+ months of the U.S. data record, going back to 1895.
The Great U.S. Drought of 2012 “may well turn out to be the biggest weather story of 2012
Wildfire seasone: The 2012 U.S. fire season was the 3rd worst in U.S. history.
Read the read the rest of the yourself at this link.
Then go look at the global temperatures interactive map from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, and play around with its awesome interactive features.The fires in Arizona make sense only in this contest. Yes the news is tragic, but it is no surprise to those In the (K)now
Scientists have been warning for years about impending disaster.
It seems the future has arrived, and it is now.



One Response  
  • Sunspotter writes:
    July 4th, 2013

    BBC America had a similar story on its news program Wednesday evening.
    It related the fires and other extreme weather all over the globe to climate change, just as this post did the day before.


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