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HI TECH: New surgical ‘knife’ can detect cancer Comment on this post ↓
July 22nd, 2013 by Warren Swil

‘Souped-up scalpel’

analyzes cell molecules

after they’re removed

The web edition of The Independent, a leading British daily newspaper, features a story about the revolutionary new “intelligent” knife. Click image to enlarge.

A NEW HIGH TECH TOOL undergoing clinical trials in the United Kingdom, could revolutionize – and make more accurate –  detection of cancerous cells left after surgery to remove tumors.
The story – which has yet to be covered in any major U.S. publication – has been widely reported in Briatin.
In a BBC News report By James Gallagher Cancer surgery: Tumour ‘sniffing’ surgical knife designed aired July 17, the health and science reporter, explained: “The clever part is the machine to which [the knife] is connected.
“The smoke that is produced is vaporized tissue. This is sucked along a tube into a Mass Spectrometer, which, in effect, sniffs the smoke, analyzing its molecules.”
Gallagher noted that “… early results, published in the journal Science, showed that it was 100 percent accurate in telling whether the tissue was cancerous.
“[It] could be approved for use throughout the National Health Service within five years.”

The same day, July 17, a report by Jocelyn Kaiser Smart Knife Sniffs Out Cancer Cells appeared in Science Magazine

The “intelligent” knife is used like a scalpel during surgery to remove cancerous tissue which is then analyzed by a Mass Spectrometer. It has proven very effective in trials.

The “intelligent” knife is used like a scalpel during surgery to remove cancerous tissue which is then analyzed by a Mass Spectrometer. It has proven very effective in trials.

“[R]esearchers have developed a surgical knife that can sniff the smoke made as it cuts tissue, almost instantly detecting whether cells are cancerous or healthy,” Kaiser wrote.
“The souped-up scalpel works by analyzing lipids, the fatty molecules that make up much of the cell membrane.”
The following day, July 18, the story was picked up by one of the best papers in the U.K., the Independent.
In Surgical ‘smart’ knife that detects tumours could curb spread of cancer
Kevin Rawlinson writes: “[A] surgical knife that can detect when it is cutting through cancerous tissue is being tested in hospitals, raising hopes that the spread of cancer left behind after surgery could soon be curbed more successfully.”
 In the online text accompanying Gallagher’s BBC News story, we learn more.
“An ‘intelligent’ knife that can sniff out tumours to improve cancer surgery has been developed by scientists,” Gallagher reports.
“The Imperial College London team hopes to overcome the dangerous and common problem of leaving bits of the tumour in a patient, which can then regrow.”
The “iKnife” is now being tested in clinical trials to see if it saves lives.
The report adds: “Surgeon Dr. Emma King, of Cancer Research UK, said: “The iKnife is an exciting development to guide cancer surgeons during operations.

The “intelligent” knife is used like a scalpel during surgery to remove cancerous tissue which is then analyzed by a Mass Spectrometer. It has proven very effective in trials.

The “intelligent” knife is used like a scalpel during surgery to remove cancerous tissue which is then analyzed by a Mass Spectrometer. It has proven very effective in trials.

“If its usefulness is supported in further clinical trials, it could potentially reduce the time spent in theatre for many patients.”
The development was also reported July 18 in a story by Jeremy Hsu in IEE Spectrum: Smart Knife Detects Cancer in Seconds
“A new smart knife puts the pathology lab in surgeons’ hands by sniffing out cancer cells as it cuts flesh,” Hsu writes.
“The  so-called intelligent knife, also known as ‘iKnife,’ could allow surgeons to work more swiftly and efficiently to remove cancerous tumors without leaving behind traces of cancer cells.”
This is a truly remarkable development that will have profound implications for millions of people around the globe.
Remember you saw it here first. At In the (K)now, it is our mission to let you – literally sometimes – find out what you don’t know before it can hurt you.
 
 

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2 Responses  
  • Tumor's gone writes:
    July 22nd, 2013

    This is an important development.
    I wonder when The New York Times will catch up and publish some REAL news….like this.

  • doubting thomas writes:
    July 22nd, 2013

    Every time someone claims to make a major advance in cancer treatment it should be viewed with skepticism.
    The jury is still out on this one.
    Clinical trials are still under way, and tumor sufferers should not get their hopes up until the evidence is conclusive.


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