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CURE FOR UNEMPLOYMENT? Online porn industry booming Comment on this post ↓
August 19th, 2013 by Warren Swil

Frank examination of topic

reveals the naked truth

Paul Mason, presenter of the Newsnight segment on internet porn. Click image to enlarge.

WHILE MILLIONS OF AMERICANS remain without work, there is one global industry that is booming – and hiring thousands of new workers!
According to an authoritative, comprehensive and frank half-hour “Newsnight” segment on the BBC this weekend – something highly unlikely ever to be seen on network television in the U.S. ­– free, graphic pornography available on the internet is changing the very nature of sex “education” with effects hitherto unknown on the millions who watch it.
There is NO VIDEO with this post. We are an R-rated platform.

THE SHOW IS HOSTED by Paul Mason, economics editor of Newsnight.
In his behind-the-scenes story about it,
Online porn boom: Liberating minds or damaging brains? he begins with:
“ What’s it like to work on Newsnight?”
I’ve been asked that question many times as I report from workplaces across Britain, but never in a place like this.
“It’s a small industrial unit outside Birmingham and the man in the overalls, conversing casually with me about our respective jobs, is doing a particular kind of manual labour.

The web site Tube Video, where thousands of free porn videos are available on demand. Click image to enlarge.

The kind you need to do if you are a porn actor between takes.”
The show features a round-table discussion of participants with various expertise and a variety of occupations, including one online live pornography actress.
Introducing the show, Mason explains: “Large amounts of porn are now available free because of the so-called “tube” sites, where, with no age warnings, you can click straight through to hard core video.
“And that is not regulated because it is based off shore.”
One such site is Tube Video, where you can see that almost all of its offerings are viewed by hundreds of thousands of people. That’s a big audience.
One of the first guests is Peter Johnson, Chief Executive of the British Authority for Televison on Demand.
ATVOD is the independent co-regulator for the editorial content of UK video on demand services that fall within the statutory definition of On-Demand Program Services.

Peter Johnson of ATVOD, the U.K. regulator of on demand video. Click image to enlarge.

“What you do is create a massively attractive proposition which is free, so you get millions and millions of visitors coming to your website,” Johnson says, “viewing free hard-core pornography – and then you upsell them premium versions of that service.”
Mason intervenes with some background.
“It’s only in the past five or six years that you have had this explosion in free porn,” he says. “What has happened has happened with all e-commerce: producers can see really quickly what the consumers want, and produce more of it.”
He notes that there is a dearth of academic studies on how this is affecting the millions of porn consumers, but cites one that is almost eight years old.

A study cited on the show reveals that 88 percent of scenes depict physical aggression against women. Click image to enlarge.

“In a 2005 study of the top-selling DVDs, 304 scenes were analyzed,” he says. “Eighty-eight percent contained physical aggression – principally a woman being spanked, forced to gag, or being slapped.
“Forty-nine percent contained verbal aggression, and targets were depicted most often as liking or ignoring the aggression.”
Meanwhile the Internet has changed porn in another massive way: interaction.
Introducing another participant, identified only as “Victoria” – a student who works as a web cam performer, specializing in sadomasochism – Mason explains:
“Here too it is in the nature of the medium for the content to push boundaries towards new kind of activity.”
“Victoria” amplifies the point.
“When they see what I do, or they hear me talk about it, they suddenly discover certain things that they didn’t know they like,” she explains with no hint of embarrassment. “Or, [they] didn’t realize were consumable to have.
“I find what I do quite powerful in a positive way. … it is helping people understand and come to terms with their sexuality.
“I list a hundred things they have never even heard of that are potential for them to have.”

IN A SECOND SEGMENT of the show Online porn boom: Liberating minds or damaging brains? Mason notes that the phenomenon is of recent origins.
“Within the space of a decade the computer screen has become a window into a wide range of sexual activity,” he says.
“So what is that doing to people?”

Cindy Gallop set up the web site “Make love not porn.” Click image to enlarge.

Cindy Gallop, a woman who dates mainly younger man, setup a website “Make love not porn,” because she noticed a change in men’s behavior she attributes to pornography.
“Hard core pornography de facto has become sex education,” Gallop says.
“Many women have sent to me … and I have experienced this myself, that on the very first sexual encounter, with someone they were dating, they found themselves being addressed with the language you hear in porn films.
“[This] can be a real shock,” she adds, “and very jarring and discordant when that happens unexpectedly the very first time you go to bed together.”
Next up is Paula Hall a psychologist with the Association for Treatment of Sex Addiction and Compulsivity, who treats people for sex addiction.
“What pornography is doing is giving us super-normal stimuli – it is exaggerating what is a very natural and instinctive desire to seek out attractive sexual partners, but it is exaggerating that,” Hall says.
“And it is giving us constant endless novelty which means that our brains are becoming more and more wired towards those pornographic images than towards partnered sex.”
Mason then explains that the British government has signaled it will require Internet providers to filter out porn so that users can specifically opt in.
Victoria, the performer, responds:
“[Prime Minister] David Cameron needs to stop trying to control people under a banner of protecting them because it is protecting nobody,” she says.
“It makes jobs harder and it perpetuates the idea that what is not normal is damaging.”
Censorship is futile, if not impossible. It may even be unconstitutional in the U.S. where the Supreme Court has long ruled that pornography is protected speech although it can be subject to certain restrictions.
This is an enormously insightful, comprehensive and thorough job of reporting a significant social issue. It is too bad it is not on “60 Minutes” or some other major U.S. media outlet.

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2 Responses  
  • Unemployed grad writes:
    August 19th, 2013

    This is so cool.
    I’ve been looking for a job since I got my BA in philosophy.
    What can I do with that?
    HERE’s the answer.
    Thanks.

  • Bjorn in San Diego writes:
    August 19th, 2013

    It’s very interesting with porn! One one level it acts as a stimuli for sexual encounters, and on another level it leads to laziness and isolation in finding a sex partner! When you meet someone real, it may not be as exciting as those scenes on the internet( which are mostly acted, and severely edited!) Porn acts as a double edge sword, it can be hot or it can be too much of the same! As a gay man I know that when we had less internet porn, guys met in bars and discos, and that was more fun AND real!


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